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  • Free Rides on Earth Day Presented by Trek

    by Tyler Britz | Apr 19, 2021
    earthday

    Each year, BCycle systems offset millions of pounds of carbon emissions in their communities. When we choose to go green with our transportation by choosing bike share, we can enact significant change in our community, especially when replacing short commutes with more environmentally-conscious options.

    This Earth Day, BCycle is happy to offer Free Single Ride Passes in select cities to continue getting more people on bikes.

    Riders in Madison, Wis., Broward, Fl., Santa Barbara, Cal., and Greenville, S.C., can redeem a promo code for a free Single Ride Pass which includes 30 minutes of riding.

    Riders in Madison, Broward, Santa Barbara, and Greenville can redeem promo code EarthDay21 online or in the app when signing up.

    Help BCycle continue on the path to a greener future when you choose to #GoByBike this Earth Day, April 22nd, and beyond.

  • New Flexible Bike Docking Tech From BCycle

    by Zachary Shahan | Mar 08, 2021

    Emily Parking Bike (2)

    More than a decade ago, when I was running a nonprofit focused on green transportation options and sustainable development, modern bikesharing was just popping onto the scene. It was a kind of revolution in the bicycle planning and bicycle commuting world, and it was built around modern, smart, fairly high-volume docking stations where people could pick up a bike or return a bike.

    In more recent years, a dockless bikesharing trend has emerged. The added flexibility of being able to leave a bike anywhere appealed to many people. Just find a bike somewhere on the street near your starting point and leave it at your destination. Easy!

    There are issues with both systems, though. With the stations with docks, bikes would often end up emptied from high-density residential areas in the morning, with not enough places to dock at high-density workplaces as well in the morning, and then the reverse trend in the late afternoon. With dockless stations, too many bikes could be left well off the beaten track, they could “clutter up” sidewalks in some areas, and it can just be a bit less predictable where you can find a bike if the region isn’t heavily saturated in them (which costs money). One more matter with the docking stations: they typically required large, fairly expensive kiosks.

    BCycle, which has been a leader in the bikesharing arena for more than a decade (and I wrote about here on CleanTechnica at least as far back as 2013), has a helpful new bikesharing station design that takes some of those challenges to heart. The new “3.0 docking stations” are beginning to roll out in California (Santa Barbara), Florida (Broward County), and Wisconsin (Madison). They are something like a middle ground between earlier capex-heavy docking stations and completely detached dockless programs.

    “BCycle has launched a new generation of dock-based bike share with the 3.0 docks,” the company writes. “The 3.0 docks combine the flexibility and streamlined infrastructure that cities and riders want with the order and predictability that have made BCycle’s bike share programs successful for more than a decade. Unique to the bike share industry, this technology allows programs to grow more quickly and at a lower cost by eliminating the need for a kiosk. Its modular design also allows for smaller stations in more locations.”

    THS00321 (2)


    The focus on flexibility is repeated throughout the press release about the news. The message is clear: you can have some of the flexibility of a dockless system with a bit more of the order and reliability that comes with docks. Notably, part of that flexibility comes from something noted in the quote above — that these are modular stations, sort of like LEGO pieces. You could put two in one spot, or 30.

    Additionally, the smaller size and greater flexibility mean that these can be spread out more diversely (almost mimicking a dockless system), and the system operator can more easily (i.e., cheaply) roll out more docking stations to specific areas as it’s determined they are needed there — as it becomes more clear where riders want to pick up and drop off bikes.

    “Our goal at BCycle is to get more people on bikes,” says Morgan Ramaker, Executive Director of BCycle, LLC. “To do that, we need to make it easy for bike share programs to grow quickly and flexibly, whether that’s expanding into new neighborhoods, or creating greater density in downtown areas. We have developed a best-of-both-worlds solution that offers the flexibility that bike share riders expect, without sacrificing the reliability that we know docks provide.”

    “BCycle’s new docks open so many doors for us,” says Helen Bradley, General Manager of Madison BCycle. “With lower costs and more flexibility, we can put docks in places we couldn’t previously — areas where space was limited, and a traditional kiosk wouldn’t fit — but where our riders want to be.”

    Here are a few more selling points and reminders of key highlights about the stations:

    • Modular, kiosk-less, easy-to-install design for countless station configuration options
    • Durable aluminum construction
    • Power savings through new technology
    • Theft deterrents
    • Easy rider access via mobile app or RFID card

    They look great too.

    Overall, these BCycle 3.0 docking stations look like winners. I look forward to seeing some pop up in my area of the world.


  • Red Bike Wins Prestigious National Grant to Support Equity Work

    by BCycle Staff | Mar 08, 2021

    Grant will expand the impact of successful Red Bike Go program

    Red Bike

    Cincinnati – Red Bike has won a Living Lab Grant from the Better Bike Share Partnership to invest in and grow the Red Bike Go program, which provides equitable access to bikeshare.  The Living Lab grant, a two and a half year $200,000 grant, will allow Red Bike to develop and test innovative, new strategies and programs to increase access to bikeshare in the region.  The goal of the Living Lab program is to develop best practices locally in bikeshare laboratories in the winning cities that can then be replicated in bikeshare systems throughout the country.

    Red Bike is one of only five organizations across the country to be designated a Living Lab City by the Better Bike Share Partnership, a national organization dedicated to building equitable and replicable shared micromobility systems.  Other cities receiving Living Lab grants include, Portland, Detroit, Chicago, and Philadelphia, the original Living Lab.

    “This is an exciting affirmation of what we’ve done so far,” said Elese Daniel, Red Bike Education and Outreach Manager.  “And it will really allow us to build out our programming, community relationships, and team in a way that I hope connects more and more people to biking – for all the reasons they need or want to use a bike.”

     

    The Red Bike Go Living Lab will focus on three key areas of growth.  First, the Cincinnati Living Lab will work with community members, organizations, and artists to expand the Red Bike network into new neighborhoods and communities, including Lower Price Hill, Walnut Hills, and further within the West End.  Second, Red Bike is piloting several youth bike programs in these target neighborhoods, working directly with teens and community partners.  Third, Red Bike will collaborate with communities and artists to infuse artistic activations throughout expansion and programming.

     

    Red Bike will be hiring additional staff to help launch and manage the Red Bike Go Living Lab.  Currently Red Bike is taking applications for an Outreach and Membership Management Assistant to support all outreach and community engagement efforts.  A full description of the position is available at www.cincyredbike.org/jobs.  Red Bike also will be hiring additional Outreach Ambassadors and Interns in the coming months.

     

    “Ensuring that everyone not only has access to Red Bike, but more importantly feels like Red Bike is actively catering to them has been a priority from day one,” said Jason Barron, Executive Director of Red Bike.  “We are incredibly proud that the Red Bike Go Program is one of the best and most creative bikeshare equity programs in the country, and we cannot wait to see what we come up with over the next two plus years.”

     

    Red Bike Go was launched in 2018 to drive Red Bike’s equity efforts. It began as a discounted $5 monthly membership for individuals experiencing lower-income, which allows for unlimited 2-hour bike rides for 30 days.  Red Bike Go has quickly become one of the most successful bikeshare equity programs in the country.  Over 700 hundred people have accessed the program.  Last year, over 25% of all Red Bike rides were taken by members of the Go program.

     

    The Red Bike Go Living Lab is all about creating partnership throughout the Cincinnati community to increase bike riding.  Red Bike is actively looking for new community and corporate partnerships to help make the Living Lab a success.  Interested organizations should complete a Community Partner Form, accessible here. To discuss corporate partnerships or sponsorships opportunities, contact Red Bike directly at support@cincyredbike.org.

     

    About Red Bike

    Red Bike is a 501c3, non-profit, with 59 bike share stations and over 500 publicly shared bicycles throughout Cincinnati, Newport, Covington, and Bellevue.  In 2019, Red Bike became one of the first bike share systems in the country to add electric-assist bicycles to the fleet. 

     

    About Better Bike Share Partnership

    The Better Bike Share Partnership is a collaboration to build equitable and replicable shared micromobility systems. The partners include The City of Philadelphia, the National Association of City Transportation Officials (NACTO) and the PeopleForBikes Foundation.

     

    Full press release from the Better Bike Share Partnership is available here.

  • BCycle Introduces New Flexible Docking Technology

    by Morgan Ramaker | Feb 11, 2021
    3.0 Station
    BCycle has launched a new generation of dock-based bike share with the 3.0 docks. The 3.0 docks combine the flexibility and streamlined infrastructure that cities and riders want with the order and predictability that have made BCycle’s bike share programs successful for more than a decade. Unique to the bike share industry, this technology allows programs to grow more quickly and at a lower cost by eliminating the need for a kiosk. Its modular design also allows for smaller stations in more locations.

     

    “Our goal at BCycle is to get more people on bikes,” said Morgan Ramaker, Executive Director of BCycle, LLC. “To do that, we need to make it easy for bike share programs to grow quickly and flexibly, whether that’s expanding into new neighborhoods, or creating greater density in downtown areas. We have developed a best-of-both-worlds solution that offers the flexibility that bike share riders expect, without sacrificing the reliability that we know docks provide.”

     

    BCycle’s new docks feature:

    Modular, kiosk-less, easy-to-install design for countless station configuration options

    Durable aluminum construction

    Power savings through new technology

    Theft deterrents

    Easy rider access via mobile app or RFID card

     

    “BCycle’s new docks open so many doors for us,” said Helen Bradley, General Manager of Madison BCycle. “With lower costs and more flexibility, we can put docks in places we couldn’t previously—areas where space was limited, and a traditional kiosk wouldn’t fit—but where our riders want to be.”

     

    Madison, Wis., Santa Barbara, Calif., and Broward County, Fla., are the first communities to launch the 3.0 docks. All BCycle docks and stations are designed in Wisconsin and made in the United States.

    Contact the BCycle Sales Team today to learn more.

  • New name, fresh look and a turbo boost feature: BCycle is now Charlotte Joy Rides

    by Laurie Larsh | Oct 05, 2020



    Urban bike sharing company Charlotte Joy Rides has a new name, a new look and a really cool new feature. Formerly Charlotte BCycle, the company’s 250 revamped e-assist bikes hit the streets of Charlotte on Wednesday — and you might notice that they go a little faster. (Its new website will be unveiled at the same time.)

    Riders can now channel their inner Lance Armstrong with a turbo boost button that allows the bike to go up to 15 mph. So if you’re running late to meet a friend or spent a little too much time picnicking in Romare Bearden Park on your lunch break, you can get to where you need to be quickly.

    “Charlotte Joy Rides’ pedal-assist bikes are going to be life-changing,” said Dianna Ward, owner and executive director of Charlotte Joy Rides. “With the additional power from the electric assist, people will be able to travel farther, faster.”

    RIDEABLE ART

    It’s not just the speed that’s been taken up a notch, the bikes themselves have been transformed into moving pieces of art, thanks to a team of Charlotte artists. In partnership with Atrium HealthBlue Cross of North Carolina and Charlotte City Center Partners, Joy Rides commissioned seven local artists to design the fleet of bikes.

    “I was honored to be one of the artists selected,” Marcus Kiser said. “As a member of the Sol Nation Collective, I love the idea of using art and design to bring awareness to renewable energy resources to combat environmental injustices.”

    Kiser joined other local artists Sydney DuarteSam GuzzieGeorgie NakimaNick NapoletanoOwl from Arko & Owl and Rosalia Torres in creating the mobile art.

    “Art and innovation go hand in hand. It’s great to see Charlotte embrace sustainable transportation solutions that are not only fun, but functional to the city,” Napoletano told CharlotteFive recently. “This is where we are headed: Where art and design, utilitarian function and beauty work together to make a more beautiful world that we can pass onto our children and our children’s children.”

    “Charlotte Joy Rides, with these e-assist bikes and new stations, are a game changer for our community and will raise the bar on the experience our residents, workers and guests enjoy as they move through Center City,” said Michael J. Smith, president and CEO of Charlotte Center City Partners.

    Blue Cross and Blue Shield Community Relations District Manager Michael Restanio called the bikes a “fun and healthy way to explore Charlotte.”

    HOW TO RIDE

    Charlotte Joy Rides are available at 33 kiosks around uptown Charlotte and adjacent neighborhoods.

    “Joy Rides has always been very intentional about locating stations so that they integrate with public transportation and bicycle infrastructure, such as greenways and bike lanes. Residents of the urban core, where the majority of our stations are located, will be able to choose a bike-only lifestyle,” Ward said.

    Introductory pricing is $5 for a 30-minute Flash Pass, or $30 for 24-hour Joy Pass. Monthly and yearly options starting at $50 are also available for purchase online.

    Each bike comes equipped with a lock. Free helmets that riders can borrow are available for pickup by emailing info@charlottejoyrides.com. Riders must be at least 18 years old.


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